Stethoscope on the Cardiogram

Angiography

angiography.jpg

Angiography is an imaging test that uses X-rays to view body’s blood vessels. The X-rays provided by an angiography are called angiograms. This test is used to study narrow, blocked, enlarged, or malformed arteries or veins in many parts of the body, including brain, heart, abdomen, and legs.

A coronary angiogram is an X-ray of the arteries in the heart. This shows the extent and severity of any heart disease, and can help to figure out how well the heart is working.

Why it's done

The doctor may recommend to have a coronary angiogram if you have:

  • Symptoms of coronary artery disease, such as chest pain (angina)

  • Pain in your chest, jaw, neck or arm that can't be explained by other tests

  • New or increasing chest pain (unstable angina)

  • A heart defect you were born with (congenital heart disease)

  • Abnormal results on a noninvasive heart stress test

  • Other blood vessel problems or a chest injury

  • A heart valve problem that requires surgery

Procedure

Angiography is an imaging test that uses X-rays to view your body’s blood vessels. The X-rays provided by an angiography are called angiograms. This test is used to study narrow, blocked, enlarged, or malformed arteries or veins in many parts of your body, including your brain, heart, abdomen, and legs. A coronary angiogram is an X-ray of the arteries in the heart. This shows the extent and severity of any heart disease, and can help you to figure out how well your heart is working.

 

How long will an angiography take?

You can expect the test to last half an hour, although it can sometimes take longer. During your procedure, you’ll be monitored by a heart monitor that records your heart rate and rhythm. If you feel unwell or experience discomfort at any time, you should tell a member of the hospital staff.